Archive for Lewis Hamilton

Michael Schumacher Return Welcomed by Rivals

Posted in Felipe Massa, Ferrari, Formula 1, Jenson Button, Lewis Hamilton, Michael Schumacher with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 31, 2009 by autoracingpower

Michael Schumacher

Michael Schumacher

Forget the radical regulation changes, the withdrawal of BMW from the championship, Felipe Massa’s life-threatening accident and the potential break-up of Formula 1, the focus of Formula 1 is clearly on the return of F1 legend Michael Schumacher.

Schumacher will return to Formula 1 on August 23rd in Valencia, Spain for the European Grand Prix in place of the injured Felipe Massa for Ferrari.

Current Formula 1 drivers are welcoming the return of Schumi.

“It will be good to have Michael back out there racing again,” said Button.

“There are very good people out there racing at the moment, but to have Michael there again will be very special, although I’m sure we all wish Felipe was there also.”

Current Formula 1 World Champion Lewis Hamilton has also commented on Schumacher’s return, saying it will be an “honour and a privilege” to compete against the F1 “legend.”

“I am excited by the possibility of Michael Schumacher’s return to Formula 1 assuming it happens, but my thoughts are still with Felipe and his family following his terrible accident in Hungary,” said Hamilton.

“Michael is one of the sport’s greatest competitors and a legend in his own right and it would be great to compete against him.

“The whole world will be watching his return to the cockpit in Valencia and it will not only be fascinating to see how he readies himself for his grand prix comeback but also an honour and a privilege to race against him for the very first time. I wish him well.”

Source: PlanetF1.com

New Evidence Disqualifies Hamilton from Australian GP

Posted in Formula 1, Jarno Trulli, Lewis Hamilton, McLaren Mercedes, Toyota with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 2, 2009 by autoracingpower

hamilton-australian-gpIn last Sunday’s Australian Formula 1 race, Toyota’s Jarno Trulli finished the race in the third. He was later penalized 25 seconds for an alleged illegal pass of Lewis Hamilton while the safety car was out. McLaren was responsible for filing the complaint. The Trulli’s penalty pushed Hamilton into the third position, a very impressive finish especially considering Hamilton started at 18th on the grid.

New evidence has now surfaced that is indicating Hamilton let Trulli go by intentionally. Hit the jump to continue… Continue reading

Nico Rosberg Fastest in First Melbourne Practice Round

Posted in Brawn GP, Ferrari, Formula 1, Heikki Kovalainen, Jenson Button, Kazuki Nakajima, Kimi Raikkonen, Lewis Hamilton, Williams-Toyota with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 27, 2009 by autoracingpower

nico-rosberg-williams-toyotaNico Rosberg of Williams-Toyota had the fastest lap in the first 90 minute practice session. His fastest lap was set at 1:26.687. Teammate Kazuki Nakajima had the second fastest lap of 1:26.736, which was 0.049 seconds behind Rosberg. Ferrari’s Kimi Raikkonen finished 3rd with a time of 1:26.750. Brawn GP team driver Rubens Barrichello had the 4th fastest lap at 1:27.226. The pre-race favorite, Jenson Button, also of Brawn GP, maintained the 6th best lap with 1:27.467.

Continue reading

Ferrari President and Shumacher Sound Off on Formula 1 Rule Changes

Posted in Ferrari, Formula 1 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 20, 2009 by autoracingpower

ferarri-f1The President of Ferrai, Luca Cordero di Montezemolo, has lashed out against Formula One’s new scoring system calling it “dangerous” and “absurd”. The FIA’s new scoring system will name the champion based on who wins the most races as opposed to the previous points system. If this system was in place last year the championship would have been handed to Felipe Massa instead of Lewis Hamilton.

“I find it really absurd, serious and dangerous that one week before the start of the season we have created a situation of this nature which is very negative for our credibility, the teams, the constructors, the supporters, the journalists and the sponsors,” said Montezemolo. “I would like this climate to become more responsible, the teams have already reduced their costs by 50 percent. It’s important to create a more serene climate and to avoid continuously changing the rules, things that provoke trouble and worries for those doing the work.”

7-time World Champion Michael Schumacher has also recently expressed his disagreement of the new rules the FIA has imposed on Formula 1, especially the new scoring system.

“I cannot imagine those changes to help F1, especially regarding the new system to find the champion,”Schumacher said.

“I cannot see how it makes sense to eventually have a world champion who has less points than the driver coming in second, even if I think it is a good move to strengthen the winner’s position.”

The Formula 1 season resumes on March 29th in Melbourne, Australia.

Source: AFP, CNN

Vodafone McLaren Mercedes MP4-24 Photos, Press Pack and Technical Specification

Posted in Formula 1, Heikki Kovalainen, Lewis Hamilton with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 16, 2009 by autoracingpower

vodafone-mclaren-mercedes-mp4-24Ferrari was first with the F60, then Toyota with the TF109, now McLaren has introduced their new 2009 Formula 1 car to the world, the Vodafone McLaren Mercedes MP4-24. Judging from the pictures, Lewis Hamilton and Heikki Kovalainen look very happy with the design of the new car with huge smiles all around. As expected, the look of the car is very similar to the Ferrari F60 and Toyota TF109. A side-by-side comparison of the MP4-24 and last year’s McLaren F1 car may leave you believing that they are taking a step in the wrong direction aesthetically. Don’t blame McLaren. Channel all your rage towards the regulations. Let’s just hope the sacrifice in looks is forgotten as soon as the boys hit the track.

Aerodynamics

This year’s aerodynamic regulations were framed by the FIA and the Overtaking Working Group (helmed by Vodafone McLaren Mercedes engineering director Paddy Lowe, Ferrari’s Rory Byrne and Renault’s Pat Symonds) which met throughout 2007 in order to address the issues affecting passing in Formula 1.

The OWG’s influence can be most clearly seen around the front wing, which has been widened, and the rear wing – which is now more compact. Other factors affecting aerodynamics include the banning of ancillary appendages, the addition of driver-adjustable front-wing flaps and a heavily revised diffuser.

KERS

The MP4-24’s KERS device has been developed in collaboration with McLaren and Mercedes-Benz HighPerformanceEngines, which has been developing and refining the system for almost two years. The device enables the car to recover energy under braking, store the energy for a lap and release it when the driver presses a button on the steering wheel.

With a fully optimised KERS device’s output capped at 400kJ (discharging 80bhp boost for 6.7s per lap), the development team’s primary focus has already shifted to further improving the unit’s integration within the chassis in order to minimise performance loss elsewhere within the package.

An optimised KERS package can be expected to deliver a 0.3-0.5s gain per lap.

Winter test programme

With in-season track testing now prohibited, the MP4-24 will undergo an intensive winter programme at the following venues prior to the season-opening Australian Grand Prix on March 29:

Jan 19-22 Portimao Group test one
Feb 10-13 Jerez Group test two
Mar 1-4 Jerez Group test three
Mar 9-12 Barcelona Group test four
Week 12 Private test ahead of transportation to Melbourne

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION

Chassis McLaren moulded carbon fibre/aluminium honeycomb composite incorporating front and side impact structures. Contains integral safety fuel cell
Front suspension Inboard torsion bar/damper system operated by pushrod and bell crank with a double wishbone arrangement
Rear suspension Inboard torsion bar/damper system operated by pushrod and bell crank with a double wishbone arrangement
Suspension dampers Koni
Electronics McLaren Electronic Systems control units incorporating electronics for chassis, engine and data acquisition. McLaren Electronic Systems also supplies the electronic dashboard, alternator voltage control, sensors, data analysis and telemetry systems
Bodywork One-piece engine cover and sidepod covers. Separate floor section, structural nose with integral front wing
Tyres Bridgestone Potenza
Radio Kenwood
Race wheels Enkei
Brake calipers Akebono
Brake master cylinders Akebono
Batteries GS Yuasa Corporation
Steering McLaren power-assisted
Instruments McLaren Electronic Systems
Engine
Type Mercedes-Benz FO 108W
Capacity 2.4 litres
Cylinders 8
Maximum rpm 18,000 (FIA regulatory limit for 2009)
Bank angle 90°
Piston bore maximum 98mm (FIA regulation)
Number of valves 32
Fuel Mobil High Performance Unleaded (5.75% bio fuel)
Lubricants Mobil 1 – for higher performance, lower friction and better wear resistance
Weight 95kg (minimum FIA regulation weight)
Transmission
Gearbox Seven forward and one reverse
Semi-auto Yes
Driveshafts McLaren
Clutch Hand-operated

Source: McLaren.com

Hakkinen Believes Hamilton Can Be The Greatest

Posted in Formula 1 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 4, 2008 by autoracingpower

hamhakkTwo-time Formula One world champion Mika Hakkinen believes Lewis Hamilton could become the greatest Formula One driver ever. Hamilton is the first British driver to win the championship since 1996 and is also the youngest to achieve the feat at only 23. Hamilton won four races and finished the season in second place in 2008, which was his rookie season. Hakkinen, a former McLaren driver himself, sees no reason why Hamilton can’t become the greatest Formula 1 driver if he continues to progress.

“Lewis drives so fast, he is always going to make mistakes,” Hakkinen stated. “Driving like that makes anything possible.”

“I just do not see why he cannot become the best there is. He is only in his second year in Formula One and that is a very high-pressure environment. But he deals with it. He has youth and talent on his side. He can be the greatest.”

Source: autosport.com

Details of Hamilton’s Ultimate “Supercircuit” Design Released

Posted in Auto Parts, Formula 1 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2008 by autoracingpower

lewiscarFormula One World Champion Lewis Hamilton has designed the ultimate race track. ExxonMobil, a technology partner for McLaren Mercedes, presented Hamilton the challenge of designing the ultimate “Supercircuit”. This fantasy track is a combination of the best sections from Hamilton’s favorite race tracks around the world.

Lewis stated, “I wanted to create a circuit that would be challenging, exhilarating and enjoyable, but most of all somewhere you would love to have the chance to drive and provide the definitive test for any driver, in any car.”

The full story description also includes the levels of performance that are required by the car, auto parts, engine, race lubricant.

Lewis’ Supercircuit starts on the home straight. As Hamilton waits for the red lights to go out, his heart rate climbs to 170bpm in anticipation of the start, for this is going to be no ordinary lap. Suddenly the lights go out; Lewis releases the clutch to let loose in excess of 750bhp through the rear wheels of his Vodafone McLaren Mercedes MP4-23. He accelerates towards Turn 1…

1. Turn 8, Istanbul Speed Park (5th gear, 260 kph, 5g)
A super fast corner to begin the lap. Lewis withstands up to 5g for six seconds through this quadruple apex left hander, making it the longest and most physical corner on the Grand Prix calendar. The prolonged lateral loads place the engine’s 300 moving parts under enormous stress and make it staggeringly tough on Lewis’s neck muscles. “You have to attack this corner,” says Lewis. “A bump at the first apex destabilises the car and you have to be very careful with how you position it, otherwise you can have a big oversteer moment.”

2. Estoril, Magny Cours (5th gear, 200 kph, 3.5g)
Lewis’s neck gets little respite because Estoril, another long and fast corner, comes next. It’s a double apex right hander, through which Lewis has to plant the throttle in fifth gear without being able to see his exit. The track undulates through 180 degrees, leaving him on a high speed rollercoaster. “Due to the high speeds,” he says, “the car generates a lot of downforce through this corner and it feels planted to the track. It’s great fun, but it’s vital to make a good exit because a long straight follows.”

3. 130R, Suzuka (6th gear, 295 kph, 4g)
Lewis will have to wait until 2009 to drive a his Grand Prix race car at Suzuka for the first time, but such is the track’s fearsome reputation that he has included two corners from the former Japanese Grand Prix venue on his Mobil 1 Superlap. 130R is a left hander, so called because it has a radius of 130 metres, and it’s taken flat in top gear with the engine screaming at its 19,000rpm limit. Lewis turns in smoothly and lets the car run wide over the smooth exit kerb to ensure that he scrubs off as little speed as possible.

4. Eau Rouge, Spa Francorchamps (7th gear, 295 kph, 3.5g)
Like 130R, Eau Rouge is a section that’s taken flat out. The corner is in fact three bends, a left right left flick up the side of a hill, and it sees Lewis experience lateral and vertical g-forces. “This is one of the best corners on the calendar,” says Lewis. “It’s not difficult, but you’re just excited all the way through it. As you climb up the side of the hill, there’s a moment when all you can see from the cockpit is the sky. It’s fantastic because you lose your stomach over the crest at the top.” The car loses a bit of speed as it climbs the hill, but the whole section still takes only one second to complete at 305kph.

5. Tabac, Monaco (4th gear, 172 kph, 2.5g)
After a long period on full throttle, Lewis needs to be careful not to out brake himself on this slippery section of street circuit. Tabac is the slowest corner on the lap, through which the Mobil 1 oil inside Lewis’s Mercedes V8 engine travels faster than the car. “At the Monaco Grand Prix we have maximum downforce,” says Lewis, “so the car feels planted to the ground. But with the barriers so close there is no room for error; you have to be very precise.” Some slippery white lines at the exit can induce oversteer as Lewis tries to get back on the power, making it a great test of driver skill.

6. Turn 1, Suzuka (5th gear entry, 255 kph, 3.5g)
The car accelerates quickly along the downhill run towards Suzuka’s Turn 1. Lewis is into seventh gear when he turns into this double apex right, through which he has to turn, brake and change down three gears before hitting the first apex. Without changing his steering lock, Lewis hustles the car to the second apex, where he gets back on the power and accelerates uphill towards the exit kerb.

7. Pouhon, Spa Francorchamps (6th gear, 260 kph, 4.5g)
The second of Spa Francorchamps’ entries on the Mobil 1 Superlap. Like Suzuka’s Turn 1, Pouhon has a downhill approach, but Lewis doesn’t touch the brakes before he turns into this double apex left. He has a small confidence lift, changes down one gear and then gets back on the power as soon as possible. “You have to carry as much speed through the corner as possible,” says Lewis, “and that means having the guts to get back on the power as soon as possible. You have to be careful because you can’t touch the kerbs.”

8. Casino Square, Monaco (3rd gear, 130 kph, 2.5g)
The Casino is the most famous landmark in Monaco. The cars pass to the left of its revolving doors as they enter Casino Square, where they are faced with a blind and bumpy right hander. Lewis slows his car to just over 160kph and positions it in the
middle of the track for the entry. “I really enjoy driving through here,” he says, “because one corner leads to another. There is not rest for the driver.” As soon as he hits the apex kerb he’s back on the power, but he needs to be wary of two bumps at the exit, which induce wheelspin and make it difficult to feed in the power of his Mercedes-Benz V8.

9. Mergulho, Interlagos (4th gear, 175 kph, 3g)
It was here, on the final lap of the 2008 Brazilian Grand Prix, that Lewis prepared to pass Timo Glock for fifth place and claim his maiden world title. But that’s not why he’s included it on his Mobil 1 Superlap. “This is a very bumpy left hander,” says Lewis. “It slopes downhill and you can carry more speed than you initially think is possible because a compression in the middle of the corner helps to turn the car. You’re really on the limit and you need amazing car control to keep a hold of it.” A clean exit is vital because Lewis carries that speed all the way to Copse, the final corner on the lap.

10. Copse, Silverstone (7th gear, 290 kph, 4.5g)
This is one of the fastest Grand Prix corners and it grabs Lewis’s attention in more ways than one. He approaches it in seventh gear and literally throws the car towards the apex barrier. Yes, a barrier separates the pitlane and the track at this point, which makes the 273kp/h corner completely blind. “You can’t touch the brakes,” says Lewis. “You have to turn in with a small lift and just hope you get round.” The direction of the wind influences car performance through here because a head wind generates more aerodynamic downforce than a tail wind. “If the conditions are right,” continues Lewis, “you can take Copse without a lift, but that’s pretty scary.”

Source: F1sa.com