Archive for Kinetic Energy Recovery System

Williams Toyota Still Toying with KERS for 2010

Posted in Auto Parts, Formula 1, FOTA, KERS, McLaren Mercedes with tags , , , , , , , , on July 31, 2009 by autoracingpower
KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery System

KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery System

Williams Toyota is still considering running KERS (kinetic energy recovery system) in the 2010 Formula 1 season. This would conflict with the FOTA’s ban KERS in 2010 but Williams is not apart of FOTA as they chose to break ranks and sign up for the 2010 Formula 1 season during the FOTA vs. FIA battle.

The FOTA KERS ban is considered a gentleman’s agreement among the FOTA members but Williams has continued to develop their flywheel KERS system throughout the year as the technical regulations will permit teams to use the controversial hybrid system in 2010.

One FOTA member that may want to consider reviewing the KERS ban is McLaren, who have built a reliable system and used it in many races this season.

Source: MSN Sports

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‘KERS Not Relevant to Road Cars According to Mercedes Engineer

Posted in Auto Parts, Formula 1, KERS, McLaren Mercedes with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2009 by autoracingpower
KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery System

KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery System

McLaren-Mercedes is the only Formula 1 team that has run KERS (Kinetic Energy Recovery System) on both of its cars in every race this season. McLaren has developed two different KERS. One system is electric and uses batteries to store power, while the other is mechanical and uses a flywheel to store power.

A source inside the engineering department has stated that neither KERS system currently has an application for road vehicles at this time. McLaren managing director Anthony Sheriff recently said, “What’s important is that it’s pushing the envelope of battery technology to its limits and that has got to be good news.”

Source: Autoblog

Will BMW Sauber have KERS for Australia Opener?

Posted in Auto Parts, BMW Sauber, Flywheel, KERS, Nick Heidfeld with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 11, 2009 by autoracingpower
KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery System

KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery System

Nick Heidfeld has said that BMW Sauber has yet to make a decision on whether the or not they will be using a kinetic energy recovery system for the opening race in Melbourne, Australia.

Williams and Toyota have stated that they will not have cars with KERS on the starting grid. Red Bull has announced that they might postpone the introduction of their KERS system.

BMW Sauber is believed to have one of the most advanced kinectic energy recovery systems and has been one of the biggest supporters of the technology in Formula 1. The precise benefits gained by using the KERS is still not known. While the system delivers an instant horsepower boost at the driver’s command, the system adds an additional 40 kg of weight to the car, changes the weight distribution, raises the center of gravity, needs more cooling, and affects stability in braking. And then there is also the question of reliability.

“Reliability seems quite good and we are testing it quite often, not all the time, but on and off to understand the benefits that we will hopefully have,” Heidfeld stated on the Formula 1 website.

Read More About KERS

Source: AP

Flywheel and KERS – Racing Auto Parts

Posted in Auto Parts, Flywheel, Formula 1 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 24, 2008 by autoracingpower

In a traditional vehicle, the flywheel is the large wheel connected to the crankshaft that provides the momentum to keep the crankshaft turning while power is not being applied. The momentum is created by the energy generated during the power stroke. This energy is also used to drive the crankshaft, connecting rods and pistons during the three idle strokes of the 4-stroke cycle. This makes for a smooth engine speed. The flywheel forms one surface of the clutch and is the base for the ring gear.

Flywheel and KERS

flywheel-kers

The upcoming season of Formula 1 will allow teams to incorporate the new Kinetic Energy Recovery System (KERS) system into their cars. This addition will essentially turn the cars into hybrids. KERS is not a battery electric hybrid technology that most people are familiar with. The recovered energy is stored in a rotating flywheel instead of being converted into electricity and then applied through an electric motor. The flywheel is approximately 5 kilograms and contained inside the car’s transmission. This stored energy in the flywheel can be used by pressing a boost button during certain times of the race.

Source: auto.indiamart.com, gas2.org